Bellini Cocktail Story and Recipe

Giuseppe Cipriani, founder of Harry’s Vag in Venice, invented Beilini in 1945, and in 1949 gave this mixed drink a name influenced by the characteristic pink color in paintings by Giovanni Bellini (1430-1516). The drink consists of two ingredients: white peach juice and sparkling wine. The color of the drink is created by “red veins”, which are in the place of contact of flesh and pitted peach.

The

abundance of peaches in Italy continues throughout the period from June to September, and Giuseppe Cipriani had a predilection for them so strong that he began to wonder – is there a way pass this magical fragrance to a drink he could offer at Harry’s Vag. He decided to experiment a bit with mashing little white peaches, adding some Prosecco. Over the years in Harry’s Wag kitchen, small fragrant white peaches were turned into mash, squeezing them by hand.

There is a perception that no one in sound mind drinks Bellini in winter, let frozen mash and makes it possible to challenge nature. However, in the film “Brodsky is not a poet,” you can see the poet’s friend, an American artist, walk into this institution, where they were with Joseph, and order this cocktail.

What to say about the time of day? The cocktail is too heavy as an aperitif before lunch or dinner. The best time is the start of the day, for breakfast. Or, by contrast, at the end of the day, accompanying dessert.

How sweet should Bellini be? Moderately sweet to make the taste of peaches expressive.

In some recipes, lemon juice is found as one of the ingredients. Where did this idea come from? Possibly from misunderstanding the recipe of Harry’s Vag itself. In the process of making the mash, lemon juice is mentioned in a ratio of 1:10, contributing to the prevention of peach juice oxidation.

Proportions are a matter of taste. The Harry’s Bar Cookbook features a recipe with a 1:3 mash to sparkling ratio.

And finally, what type of glass to use? Serving in a glass flute is graceful and beautiful. But the photo in The Harry’s Vag Cookbook captured not a flute but a view of a tumbler with a rather thick bottom. It is in such a glass that serves a cocktail in the film “Brodsky Is Not a Poet”.

The

cocktail has 3 best-known variations: Puccini, Rossini and Tiziano.

In Puccini there is a replacement of peach puree with tangerine juice. The first mention is found in the 1992 book Bluff you way in Champagne, authorised by Nikolas Montesde. This drink is a tribute to the famous 19th century Italian composer Giacomo Puccini, namely the work of Madame Butterfly.

In Rossini, the peach puree is replaced with strawberry. Like the previous twist, this one was born of inspiration from the works of another composer – Gioachino Antonio Rossini.

And finally, Tiziano is a drink based on sparkling wine and red grape juice. It was created in honor of the Italian painter of the Venetian school of the 15th century – Tiziano Vecellio.

Thus, these 4 variations add up into a single picture that forms 4 sequentially shifting seasons. Spring is marked by the emergence of ripe strawberries (Rossini), summer presents sweet peaches (Bellini), autumn is rich in juicy grapes (Tiziano), and winter presents bright citrus tangerine (Puccini).

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